Little Scrappy Bag (free pattern)

These cute little satchels are so easy and quick to make! They only take about a half hour to crochet, and have only the most basic stitches. I made one for my son as a way to carry around those small toys that he needs to have with him at all times, and it was so fun that I spent the next two days making a whole bunch more. These little satchels are a great way to use up even really tiny scrap yarn balls, and are also a great way to experiment with color combos.

Note: This pattern is written so that the bag can be made as one continuous piece, without having to cut the yarn. If you want to change colors, do so at anytime with whatever method you prefer. As you work the pattern, the side that is facing you – the front – becomes the outside of the bag, so your stitches will all be facing the same way and will have that uniformity. 🙂

Base:

Ch 17

Round 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hk and in next 14 ch, 4 sc in last ch, [On the other side of the ch, sc in next 14 ch, 4 sc in next ch, sl st to 1st sc]

Round 2: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in next 15 st, 3 sc in each of next 2 st, sc in next 17 st, 3 sc in each of next 2 st, sl st to 1st sc

Round 3: Ch1, sc in same st, sc in next 16 st, 2 sc in next st, sc in next 2 st, 2 sc in next st, sc in next 19 st, 2 sc in next st, sc in next 2 st, 2 sc in next st, sc in next st, sl st to 1st sc

Body:

Round 4: Ch4 (counts as 1st dc and ch1), *sk st, dc in next st, ch1, rep from * all the way around, sk st, sl st to 3rd ch of beg ch4, sl st into next ch sp

Round 5: Ch4 (counts as 1st dc and ch1), *sk st, dc in next ch sp, ch1, rep from * all the way around, sk st, sl st to 3rd ch of beg ch4, sl st into next ch sp

Rounds 6-15: Rep round 5

Round 17: Ch1, 2 sc in same ch sp, 2 sc in each ch sp all the way around, sl st to 1st sc, sl st into next sc

Strap:

Ch110, sl st to sc directly across from where ch started, sl st to next st, sc in each ch of the 110, sl st to sc next to the sc where ch110 is anchored.

Cut yarn, weave in ends.

Good! Now grab some more scraps and make another one. 😉

Colorful C2C Border

You know when you finish a blanket, not because you think it’s big enough, but because you know you don’t have enough yarn left to do another row and do a border? Yeah? Well that’s the situation I was in when I did my patchwork C2C blanket with leftover yarn. There was just a tiny bit left of each of the five colors, so I designed a small colorful border that incorporated the colors and style of the blanket. Here’s the free pattern:

Change color every round.

Round 1: Join in any corner with a sl st, ch3, sl st in same corner, *[ch3, sk 3 st, sl st bet c2c groups] across the side, ch3, (sl st, ch3, sl st) in corner, repeat from * 3 more Xs, omitting last corner, sl st to 1st sl st, break yarn

Round 2: Join in any corner with standing sc, (sc, ch 2, 2sc) in same corner, *3sc in each ch3 sp across the side, (2sc, ch2, 2sc) in corner, rep from * 3 more Xs, omitting last corner, sl st to standing sc, break yarn

Round 3: Join in any corner with sl st, ch3, sl st in same corner, *ch3, sk 2 st, sl st bet groups of sc, (ch3, sl st bet sc groups) across the side, ch3, sk last 2 sc, (sl st, ch3, sl st) in corner, rep from * 3 more Xs, omitting last corner, sl st to 1st sl st, break yarn

Round 4: same as Round 2, except in the corners just do 3sc

Round 5: Join anywhere with *sl st, (ch1, sk st, sl st in back loop of next sc, ch1, sl st in same back loop again, ch 1, sk st, rep from * all the way around.

Note: I got the pattern and tutorial for the patchwork c2c blanket without the border from https://www.thepatchworkheart.co.uk/2018/06/c2c-jayg-corner-to-corner-join-as-you.html, and it’s very well done!

Very Simple Flower Granny Square

This pretty flower square is so simple – it will let whatever colors you choose take center stage! I elected to do the squares in bright colors with a gray background…however I think pastels with a white background would be stunning as well. Here’s the free pattern:

Color A

Make a magic circle

Round 1: Ch2, (counts as 1st hdc), 11 more hdc in circle, sl st to ch2

Color B

Round 2: Join in any hdc, ch2, dc, (counts as 1st dc2tog), ch1, * dc2tog in next st, ch1, rep from * 10more Xs, sl st to 1st dc2tog

Round 3: Sl st to ch sp, ch2, dc3tog in same ch sp, (counts as 1st dc4tog), ch3, *dc4tog in next ch sp, ch3, rep from *10 more Xs, sl st to 1st dc4tog

Color C

Round 4: Join in any ch sp, ch3, 2dc in same ch sp, *ch2, 3dc in next ch sp, ch1, 3hdc in next ch sp, ch 1, 3dc in next ch sp, rep from * 3 more Xs, sl st to 3rd ch of beg ch3

Round 5: Sl st over to corner sp, ch3, 2dc, ch2, 3dc in corner, *ch1, 3hdc in each of next 2 ch sp, (3dc, ch2, 3dc) in corner sp, rep from * 3 more Xs, omitting last corner, sl st to 3rd ch of beg ch3.

Crochet Hugs & Kisses Starshine Afghan

Finally! Someone I know is having a baby. Yay! My next door neighbor is expecting a boy and I am so happy for her. (And for me because I had an excuse to make a baby blanket. Heh!)

The pattern for this one was written by Jeanne Steinhilber of the Crochet Crowd, and it’s adorably called the Hugs & Kisses Starshine Afghan. I alternated 4 rounds of blue with 2 rounds of gray for the whole blanket.

It was an easy pattern that worked up quickly. Also, I think it’s ideal for a boy baby because it’s a cute star shape with no frills or ruffles.

And on to the next project!

The Squiggly Square Blanket

(another scrap buster)

Like most of you, I had a big bag full of partial skeins of yarn – my scraps – and I wanted to use them up. I have done scrap blankets before, but this time I wanted to try something new and different. And so I made the Squiggly Square Blanket!

I found the pattern for the square here: http://hooksandyarns.blogspot.com/2011/10/wiggles-square-for-sibol.html and I used a join-as-you-go (JAYG) method to put the whole thing together. If you have never tried joining squares this way, I will tell you that it’s worth learning because there are only two ends to weave in. The cute squiggly squares are super easy to make and really fun. Happy crocheting!

Cozy Striped Throw

You know that mohair-like yarn? Like it’s soft, but also kind of rough? I didn’t know if I could make a blanket with it because it’s so airy and light, but I gave it a try and you know what? It is so cozy! Here’s the free pattern:

With color A ch 150

Row 1: Hdc in 2nd ch from hk and in each ch across

Row 2-20: Ch 1 (doesn’t count as a st here and throughout), blohdc in 1st st and each st across

Row 21: Ch 3 (counts as dc), *sk 2 st, v-st in next st, rep from * to last 3 st, sk 2 st, dc in last st, changing to color B on last yo, do not break yarn for color A

Row 22: Ch 3, v-st in each v-st across the row, dc in last st, pull out a big loop to save your work with color B, do not turn

Row 23: Go back to the beginning of the row, pull color A through the 3rd ch in the ch 3, ch 3, v-st in each v-st across, dc in last dc, turn

Row 24: With color B, ch 3, v-st in each st across, dc in last dc

Repeat rows 23 and 24 until you have 4 v-st rows of each color. Break yarn for color A.

Row 29: Ch 1, hdc in 1st st, *hdc in 1st dc of v-st, hdc in sp bet dcs of v-st, hdc in 2nd st of the v-st, repeat from * across, hdc in last st, turn

Rows 30-49: Ch 1, blohdc in 1st st and each st across

Continue in this manner until blanket is desired length, throwing in a color C if you want.

Border:

Round 1: Using the color B, sc evenly around, doing 3 sc in each corner.

Rounds 2-5: Sc in each st around, doing 3 sc in each corner. Fasten off

Round 6: With color C, {puff st, ch 2 (ch 1 to finish puff plus 1 more ch), puff, ch 2, puff} in corner, sk 2 st, *ch 2, puff in next st, sk st, repeat from * to end, sk 2 st, repeat corner and sides 3 more times, fasten off

Round 7: Using color A, join in 1st ch 2 sp of corner. Ch 1 (doesn’t count as a st), *3 sc in same ch2 sp, 3 sc in next ch 2 sp, 2 sc in each ch 2 sp on the side, repeat from * 3 more times

Round 8: Sc in each stitch around (in corner spaces, sc, ch 2, sc)

Round 9: *(In corner sp 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc), crdc across side, repeat from * 3 more times

Round 10: Sc in each st around, (sc, ch 2, sc in corners)

Round 11: Repeat round 9

Rounds 12-13: Repeat round 10

Round 14: With color C, repeat round 6

Round 15: With color B, repeat round 7

Rounds 16-18: Sc in each st around, (in corners sc, ch 2, sc)

Round 19: In corners do 3 picots, along sides, 2 sc, picot, repeat from *

Atlanticus

Atlanticus is a beautiful pattern designed by Vanessa Smith of Hooked on Sunshine. It’s a mixed stitch blanket with a stunning mandala center that was surprisingly easy to crochet. (The blanket pictured above was made by me in a really short amount of time considering the large size.) The pattern can be found for free on Ravelry, along with pictures of completed blankets in every imaginable colorway. Happy crocheting!

Ruffled Rainbow Throw

Ruffle are my favorite thing to crochet! I don’t know why – they’re just so much fun for me to do. I don’t particularly love frilly ruffled things and ruffles are total yarn-eaters, but for some reason I could just sit and mindlessly crochet ruffles all day long, stopping occasionally only to run my hand back and forth over the ruffles. It’s therapeutic! If you’ve never tried crocheting ruffles before, I hope you try it soon, because it just might be your new favorite way to relax!

I adapted the Ruffled Rainbow Throw from the Rainbow Ruffle blanket at https://www.dadasplace.com/2017/03/free-rainbow-ruffle-blanket-tutorial.html for two reasons – my absolute love of crocheting ruffles and the fact that I had almost a whole skein of each of the rainbow colors left over from doing the Rainbow Sky Baby Blanket. I only had to buy one skein of black yarn for the ruffles. This throw is so quick and easy to make and can be done in any color scheme or size that you want!

Here’s the free pattern:

Abbreviations:

Ch – chain

Dc – double crochet

Hk – hook

St – stitch

BLO – back loop only

Sl st – slip stitch

Ch 135 (or whatever number of chains give you the desired width of your throw)

Row 1: Dc in 4th ch from hk and in each ch across, turn

Row 2: Ch 1, dc in first st and each st across to end, changing color on last yarn over of last dc, turn

Row 3: Ch 1, working in BLO, dc in first st and in each st across to end, turn

Repeat rows 2 and 3 until throw reaches desired length, changing colors every two rows, and ending on a row 2. (Number of rows should be a multiple of 8.)

Edging (big ruffles):

Join in any corner st, ch 3, 7 dc in same st as ch 3. Make 4 dc in each st around and 8 dc in the corners. Join to beg ch 3 with a sl st.

Front (little) ruffles:

You will be working on the front surface of the throw in the unused front loops of every eighth row.

Join in the first front loop, ch 3, sl st in same loop

Sl in next loop, ch 3, sl st in same loop, repeat to end, break yarn

Do your little ruffles in the front loops every eighth row.

Weave in all ends.

Wintertide Throw

I found the pattern for this stunning Wintertide throw on mamainastitch.com, and I thought it was so cool! The pattern calls for eight balls of bulky weight yarn, but I decided to use a gray worsted weight yarn that was leftover from other projects. To make the throw a reasonable size with the lighter weight yarn, I doubled the starting chains that the pattern called for.

The Wintertide Throw is made up of three special stitches – bobble stitch, bean stitch, and granite stitch (all explained on the pattern page) – and also makes use of front loop only stitches and back post stitches.

A beginner crocheter will find this pattern both workable and educational. And the end result will be a beautiful, cozy throw perfect for hibernating under all winter!

The Grandma Spiked My Ripple Blanket

The Grandma Spiked My Ripple Blanket is a pattern by Darlisa Riggs that you can find for free on Ravelry. (Thanks Darlisa!)

I’m one of those people that feels like the basic granny stitch looks old-fashioned and even boring, so I love when people come up with new and different applications of granny stitch patterns.

This pattern is gives the basic granny ripple a modern twist by making the middle double crochet in each triplet a spike stitch. It’s a relatively small adjustment, but it makes such a difference! The ripple ends up looking a little fuzzy, hence the name.

If you are like me and find the traditional granny stitch boring, or even if you love the granny stitch but are ready to try something just a little different, you should give this wonderful pattern a try!